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Check out the photos I took of the Jonas Brothers for Vogue here

Check out the photos I took of the Jonas Brothers for Vogue here

Wilmer Valderrama, 2012 by Katie Fischer

Wilmer Valderrama, 2012 by Katie Fischer

I photographed Paul Dano for T Style Mag and they just used the photo in an article written by Kathryn Branch regarding his upcoming film “Being Flynn” - I’d love to hear your thoughts.
http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/06/asked-answered-paul-dano/?ref=t-magazine

I photographed Paul Dano for T Style Mag and they just used the photo in an article written by Kathryn Branch regarding his upcoming film “Being Flynn” - I’d love to hear your thoughts.

http://tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/06/asked-answered-paul-dano/?ref=t-magazine

One of the most prolific women of our time. Vera Farmiga, 2012 by Katie Fischer

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Jon Heder, 2012 by Katie Fischer

Jon Heder, 2012 by Katie Fischer

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I had the opportunity to go to SNL this weekend and I loved it! SNL has single handedly shaped the landscape of American humor for the past 37 years or so. Many thanks to Bernie Brillstein and Lorne Michaels! Check out this portrait I took of SNL alum Chris Kattan from Sundance. 

I had the opportunity to go to SNL this weekend and I loved it! SNL has single handedly shaped the landscape of American humor for the past 37 years or so. Many thanks to Bernie Brillstein and Lorne Michaels! Check out this portrait I took of SNL alum Chris Kattan from Sundance. 

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Ron Livingston, Sundance 2012

Ron Livingston, Sundance 2012

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Check out these photos and more that I shot for T Style Mag at Sundance.

At Sundance I also had the opportunity of accompanying talented writer Deenah Vollmer to photograph Marina Abramovic. It was a transcending experience. As Marina spoke I fell madly in love with her energy and her insights. I truly think she should write a book or do a series of video diaries for her institute. Although her work is incredible, there is something about how she articulates her view on the world that changed the way I see everything.

Check out the article here: http://www.interviewmagazine.com/film/marina-abramovic-the-artist-is-present-sundance

At Sundance I was fortunate enough to accompany an incredible writer from Interview Mag named Deenah Vollmer as she interviewed Tim, Eric and Will Forte. Check out our collaboration at  http://www.interviewmagazine.com/film/tim-and-eric-and-will-fortes-zero-dollar-interview/#_

At Sundance I was fortunate enough to accompany an incredible writer from Interview Mag named Deenah Vollmer as she interviewed Tim, Eric and Will Forte. Check out our collaboration at  http://www.interviewmagazine.com/film/tim-and-eric-and-will-fortes-zero-dollar-interview/#_


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Greetings from Sundance. I’ll be posting photos from here but quickly check out the article I wrote and photographed for Interview about behind-the-scenes scouting star Ellie Burrows:
As the Sundance Film Festival revs up this week, the usual hype about the hottest new actors and filmmakers is hard to avoid. Less often, though, do film fans hear about someone like Ellie Burrows—even though she and her firm, Cinetic Media, have been integral in getting no fewer than ten films to this year’s Sundance screen. Burrows spends her days discovering films and developing new distribution strategies for them. Burrows is a tracker; her job is to woo filmmakers and aid in their development. Sometimes this means “tipping” programmers at film festivals to certain films that she has seen and liked.
In the world of selling films, Cinetic founders John Sloss and Bart Walker are authorities; Sloss is fond of stating that they must always be Switzerland, as neutrality is imperative when working with entities that have competing interests, so that Cinetic is able to find the best venue and home for a film as market paradigms continuously shift.  
Burrows grew up in Los Angeles to a family well entrenched in the entertainment business: her grandfather was legendary playwright Abe Burrows and her father is famed television director James Burrows (who created and directed Cheersand directed all of Will & Grace). From them, she says, she learned that “when you love what you do there is always effortlessness in it.” Yet despite her connections, Burrows began her career as most in the entertainment business do—as a lowly assistant, first at William Morris, then at This is That Corporation, where she was ultimately promoted to creative executive. 
Eventually, a year away working under the tutelage of a Shaman, whom she credits with teaching her the importance of living in a state of total awareness, provided a fresh start. Burrows developed sensitivity to filmmakers’ needs, an ability to soothe artists’ insecurities, and a knack for immediately recognizing talent. This year, Burrows scouted two of the films Cinetic will be taking to Sundance, including Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, which will be an event piece at the festival.

Greetings from Sundance. I’ll be posting photos from here but quickly check out the article I wrote and photographed for Interview about behind-the-scenes scouting star Ellie Burrows:

As the Sundance Film Festival revs up this week, the usual hype about the hottest new actors and filmmakers is hard to avoid. Less often, though, do film fans hear about someone like Ellie Burrows—even though she and her firm, Cinetic Media, have been integral in getting no fewer than ten films to this year’s Sundance screen. Burrows spends her days discovering films and developing new distribution strategies for them. Burrows is a tracker; her job is to woo filmmakers and aid in their development. Sometimes this means “tipping” programmers at film festivals to certain films that she has seen and liked.

In the world of selling films, Cinetic founders John Sloss and Bart Walker are authorities; Sloss is fond of stating that they must always be Switzerland, as neutrality is imperative when working with entities that have competing interests, so that Cinetic is able to find the best venue and home for a film as market paradigms continuously shift.  

Burrows grew up in Los Angeles to a family well entrenched in the entertainment business: her grandfather was legendary playwright Abe Burrows and her father is famed television director James Burrows (who created and directed Cheersand directed all of Will & Grace). From them, she says, she learned that “when you love what you do there is always effortlessness in it.” Yet despite her connections, Burrows began her career as most in the entertainment business do—as a lowly assistant, first at William Morris, then at This is That Corporation, where she was ultimately promoted to creative executive. 

Eventually, a year away working under the tutelage of a Shaman, whom she credits with teaching her the importance of living in a state of total awareness, provided a fresh start. Burrows developed sensitivity to filmmakers’ needs, an ability to soothe artists’ insecurities, and a knack for immediately recognizing talent. This year, Burrows scouted two of the films Cinetic will be taking to Sundance, including Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, which will be an event piece at the festival.

Take a look at this fashion video I directed for the CFDA Fashion Incubator designer Gemma Redux

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Check out my latest article/portrait of Zach Gilford for Interview Mag:
Matt Leutwyler’s new film Answers to Nothing weaves several heartwrenching stories together in a realistic portrayal of the complexity of human beings, as both heroic villains and villainous heroes. The story takes place against the backdrop of a local kidnapping in Los Angeles. One man, Ryan (played by Dane Cook), cheats on his wife as he struggles with his relationship with his absentee, philandering father. An idealistic schoolteacher faces the realization of his long-harbored dreams of heroism. An African American woman claims to “hate black people” in a projection of her self-loathing and negativity. Yet through a chance encounter, with a man named Evan (Zach Gilford), she is inspired to strive for happiness. Evan is shy, awkward and compassionate, and played with just the right combination of sensitivity and humor by the Chicago native best known for his beloved portrayal of the underdog quarterback in Friday Night Lights and for his critically acclaimed role in The River Why. Gilford was in New York this past weekend, and we were able to catch up with him to discuss this new film, Bruce Willis’s influence on his life, and his favorite directorial style.KATIE FISCHER: What appealed to you about the script forAnswers to Nothing when you first read it?ZACH GILFORD: To be honest, I was excited to do the film before I even read it. I had worked with Matt [Leutwyler, the director] before and was stoked about the opportunity to do it again. I was relieved when I read the script and discovered it was actually good. Given what I knew about him as a director and the rest of the cast, I had a good feeling everything would be executed well. With any script, it can be great on the page and not work in the end. This had a lot going for it.FISCHER: The filmmakers tactfully restrained from using an easy Hollywood ending and instead, offered the audience a bittersweet sliver of hope—what type of endings do you prefer and why?GILFORD: I definitely prefer real-life endings. But I do like having an ending. I hate when a movie just sort of ends and is so open-ended you feel like it wasn’t finished. I appreciate leaving things up to the interpretation of the audience and letting them make decisions about where things will go in the future—but the director has to make a decision; otherwise it is sort of a cop-out.FISCHER: Several plotlines were woven into Answers to Nothing. After seeing it all come together, how do you feel your part contributes to the message of the movie as a whole?GILFORD: Sadly, I haven’t been able to see the movie yet, so I have no idea how it is all brought together in the end.FISCHER: In the movie you play a shy, slightly awkward person who is dating an African-American girl who claims to “hate black people”—was it hard for you to figure out how your character was going to empathize with her?GILFORD: Again, I think this was all pretty easy due to the script. The characters discuss and laugh about the oddity of this self-hating racism. Given the characters and their arcs, I thought this was a pretty easy thing to go with.FISCHER: Do you identify with any of your character’s personality traits?GILFORD: There is a little bit of me in every part I do… I’m not really good enough to completely construct an all-new character. But I think I can identify with the romantic side of this character.FISCHER: You worked with director Matthew Leutwyler onThe River Why—how was working with him for the second time?GILFORD: Working with Matt a second time was awesome and easy. We have a shorthand, which makes work fast and easy and allows for a lot of fun and joking around. I hope I get a third chance to work with him.FISCHER: What appeals to you about the stories he chooses to tell?GILFORD: Even though River Why and Answers to Nothingwere completely different stories, they were both very rooted in reality, and that is something I am always drawn to. Both are full of authentic characters with problems that we all face.
FISCHER: After starring in successful television series and independent films, how does each format satisfy you artistically?GILFORD: I really have no preference between TV and film. I think that each individual project is its own thing and has a very different style. I have worked on big movies and small movies and network TV. I have had amazing experiences in each environment, and awful [ones]—more good than bad, though.FISCHER: How did you know that you wanted to be an actor? Were there early indications to you that you were better at it than anything else in your life?GILFORD: I wanted to be an actor when I saw the movie Die Hard. I saw Bruce Willis shooting guns and blowing stuff up, and I thought, “I wanna do that.” It really had nothing to do with acting, I just wanted a job that allowed me to do fun, bigger-than-life stuff. FISCHER: Looking at your body of work, is there a side of you that you feel you haven’t had a chance to show?GILFORD: I think I need a chance to show my bad side. I really wanna be a villain.FISCHER: What was the biggest surprise you found from being an actor in college to an actor in the business?GILFORD: Hollywood is like high school with more money, so no real surprises.FISCHER: Now that you have worked in a fair amount of projects, is there a directing style that you find more conducive to your process? How do you skate the line of what you believe to be the core of character vs. the opinion of a character a producer or director might have?GILFORD: The best directing style is the one that lets me do whatever I want. Seriously though, I like to be challenged and I like to collaborate. I love finding the medium between what I think and what a director does. I hate when a director uses the “my way or the highway” approach. But it also sucks when they tell you everything you do is great and offer no input. It’s a fine line a director has to walk. It is a hard job.ANSWERS TO NOTHING IS OUT NOW IN LIMITED RELEASE.

Check out my latest article/portrait of Zach Gilford for Interview Mag:

Matt Leutwyler’s new film Answers to Nothing weaves several heartwrenching stories together in a realistic portrayal of the complexity of human beings, as both heroic villains and villainous heroes. The story takes place against the backdrop of a local kidnapping in Los Angeles. One man, Ryan (played by Dane Cook), cheats on his wife as he struggles with his relationship with his absentee, philandering father. An idealistic schoolteacher faces the realization of his long-harbored dreams of heroism. An African American woman claims to “hate black people” in a projection of her self-loathing and negativity. Yet through a chance encounter, with a man named Evan (Zach Gilford), she is inspired to strive for happiness. Evan is shy, awkward and compassionate, and played with just the right combination of sensitivity and humor by the Chicago native best known for his beloved portrayal of the underdog quarterback in Friday Night Lights and for his critically acclaimed role in The River Why. Gilford was in New York this past weekend, and we were able to catch up with him to discuss this new film, Bruce Willis’s influence on his life, and his favorite directorial style.


KATIE FISCHER: What appealed to you about the script forAnswers to Nothing when you first read it?

ZACH GILFORD: To be honest, I was excited to do the film before I even read it. I had worked with Matt [Leutwyler, the director] before and was stoked about the opportunity to do it again. I was relieved when I read the script and discovered it was actually good. Given what I knew about him as a director and the rest of the cast, I had a good feeling everything would be executed well. With any script, it can be great on the page and not work in the end. This had a lot going for it.

FISCHER: The filmmakers tactfully restrained from using an easy Hollywood ending and instead, offered the audience a bittersweet sliver of hope—what type of endings do you prefer and why?

GILFORD: I definitely prefer real-life endings. But I do like having an ending. I hate when a movie just sort of ends and is so open-ended you feel like it wasn’t finished. I appreciate leaving things up to the interpretation of the audience and letting them make decisions about where things will go in the future—but the director has to make a decision; otherwise it is sort of a cop-out.

FISCHER: Several plotlines were woven into Answers to Nothing. After seeing it all come together, how do you feel your part contributes to the message of the movie as a whole?

GILFORD: Sadly, I haven’t been able to see the movie yet, so I have no idea how it is all brought together in the end.

FISCHER: In the movie you play a shy, slightly awkward person who is dating an African-American girl who claims to “hate black people”—was it hard for you to figure out how your character was going to empathize with her?

GILFORD: Again, I think this was all pretty easy due to the script. The characters discuss and laugh about the oddity of this self-hating racism. Given the characters and their arcs, I thought this was a pretty easy thing to go with.

FISCHER: Do you identify with any of your character’s personality traits?

GILFORD: There is a little bit of me in every part I do… I’m not really good enough to completely construct an all-new character. But I think I can identify with the romantic side of this character.

FISCHER: You worked with director Matthew Leutwyler onThe River Why—how was working with him for the second time?

GILFORD: Working with Matt a second time was awesome and easy. We have a shorthand, which makes work fast and easy and allows for a lot of fun and joking around. I hope I get a third chance to work with him.

FISCHER: What appeals to you about the stories he chooses to tell?

GILFORD: Even though River Why and Answers to Nothingwere completely different stories, they were both very rooted in reality, and that is something I am always drawn to. Both are full of authentic characters with problems that we all face.

FISCHER: After starring in successful television series and independent films, how does each format satisfy you artistically?

GILFORD: I really have no preference between TV and film. I think that each individual project is its own thing and has a very different style. I have worked on big movies and small movies and network TV. I have had amazing experiences in each environment, and awful [ones]—more good than bad, though.

FISCHER: How did you know that you wanted to be an actor? Were there early indications to you that you were better at it than anything else in your life?

GILFORD: I wanted to be an actor when I saw the movie Die Hard. I saw Bruce Willis shooting guns and blowing stuff up, and I thought, “I wanna do that.” It really had nothing to do with acting, I just wanted a job that allowed me to do fun, bigger-than-life stuff. 

FISCHER: Looking at your body of work, is there a side of you that you feel you haven’t had a chance to show?

GILFORD: I think I need a chance to show my bad side. I really wanna be a villain.

FISCHER: What was the biggest surprise you found from being an actor in college to an actor in the business?

GILFORD: Hollywood is like high school with more money, so no real surprises.

FISCHER: Now that you have worked in a fair amount of projects, is there a directing style that you find more conducive to your process? How do you skate the line of what you believe to be the core of character vs. the opinion of a character a producer or director might have?

GILFORD: The best directing style is the one that lets me do whatever I want. Seriously though, I like to be challenged and I like to collaborate. I love finding the medium between what I think and what a director does. I hate when a director uses the “my way or the highway” approach. But it also sucks when they tell you everything you do is great and offer no input. It’s a fine line a director has to walk. It is a hard job.


ANSWERS TO NOTHING IS OUT NOW IN LIMITED RELEASE.

Photo by Katie Fischer
Remember when I predicted you should watch out for Alexander Howard? Well I just wrote an article for Interview Magazine talking about his showcase tonight. Come to Mercury Lounge tonight at 8pm to see him perform!
http://www.interviewmagazine.com/blogs/music/2011-10-05/alexander-howard-mercury-lounge/
Tonight, Alexander Howard makes his solo debut at Mercury Lounge. Cutting his teeth in the New York club rock scene while studying at Columbia, Howard has emerged as one of the most dynamic new indie-pop singer/songwriters under the wing of production team ROBOPOP, the force behind Gym Glass Heroes’ smash “Stereohearts” and and indie phenomenon of Lana Del Rey. (We have a vested interest in his success, too—he’s acontributor to this blog.)"Working in the songwriting circuit, I’ve always tried to find a balance between my indie influences and pop writing," Howard says. "When I was first writing these records, I was still in songwriter mode and trying to think who else could sing them… but I realized that there aren’t too many male artists out there trying to this blend of music, so I figured I’d go for it!" At 6’4", the former collegiate oarsman is imposing in person, yet one can’t help be drawn by a kinetic creative energy and trim frame, styled with Mark McNairy kicks and Paul Smith tailoring that lend him a Ronson-esque character. That energy and style perfectly meld with Howard’s tight songwriting, clever pop hooks, and dynamic vocals. 

Photo by Katie Fischer

Remember when I predicted you should watch out for Alexander Howard? Well I just wrote an article for Interview Magazine talking about his showcase tonight. Come to Mercury Lounge tonight at 8pm to see him perform!

http://www.interviewmagazine.com/blogs/music/2011-10-05/alexander-howard-mercury-lounge/

Tonight, Alexander Howard makes his solo debut at Mercury Lounge. Cutting his teeth in the New York club rock scene while studying at Columbia, Howard has emerged as one of the most dynamic new indie-pop singer/songwriters under the wing of production team ROBOPOP, the force behind Gym Glass Heroes’ smash “Stereohearts” and and indie phenomenon of Lana Del Rey. (We have a vested interest in his success, too—he’s acontributor to this blog.)

"Working in the songwriting circuit, I’ve always tried to find a balance between my indie influences and pop writing," Howard says. "When I was first writing these records, I was still in songwriter mode and trying to think who else could sing them… but I realized that there aren’t too many male artists out there trying to this blend of music, so I figured I’d go for it!" At 6’4", the former collegiate oarsman is imposing in person, yet one can’t help be drawn by a kinetic creative energy and trim frame, styled with Mark McNairy kicks and Paul Smith tailoring that lend him a Ronson-esque character. That energy and style perfectly meld with Howard’s tight songwriting, clever pop hooks, and dynamic vocals. 

I love how reminiscent this image is of George Hurrell’s work (an old Hollywood portrait photographer)! He was a true master of showcasing a beautiful woman in a mysterious, sexy, come-hither way. 

I love how reminiscent this image is of George Hurrell’s work (an old Hollywood portrait photographer)! He was a true master of showcasing a beautiful woman in a mysterious, sexy, come-hither way. 

(Source: contronym)

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